UN Drug Czar Attacks U.S. States for Ending Cannabis Prohibition

With four American states so far having defied the United Nations and the federal government by ending marijuana prohibition, the UN’s army of drug warriors has been meeting in Vienna to plan a response and demand obedience to its global drug-control regime.

Uruguay is also in UN crosshairs, with the planetary body’s prohibition bureaucrats vowing to dispatch a “high-level mission” to the South American nation in a bid to have the cannabis plant re-criminalized in accordance with UN narcotics treaties. However, resistance to UN demands and even to the dictator-dominated outfit are growing, with experts increasingly speaking out against the entire notion of a UN-run global prohibition regime that has failed in its supposed mission to stamp out unapproved substances.

According to the UN International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), one of the global agencies responsible for waging the drug war worldwide, planetary bureaucrats are pressuring the U.S. government to defy the Constitution and impose pot prohibition on unwilling states. Beginning in 2012 with the decision of voters in Colorado and Washington State to nullify U.S. statutes and UN agreements demanding war on marijuana and its users, prohibition of the substance has suffered several major blows across the United States. Last year, voters in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington, D.C., nullified the war on pot. Before that, almost half of American states had already defied the UN and the feds by making medical marijuana legal for sick people whose doctors prescribe it.

The UN’s drug czars have for years been lashing out at the United States about the trend, to no avail. In fact, Attorney General Eric Holder, perhaps the most radical federal supremacist to ever occupy the office, was even forced to concede in congressional testimony that there are limits to Washington, D.C.’s powers to conscript state governments in the war on drugs. The broader Obama administration, meanwhile, for reasons that are not yet clear, has been pushing the UN to allow a “flexible interpretation” of its global prohibition treaties. “Things have changed since 1961,” said William Brownfield, Obama’s assistant secretary at the State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, referring to the year the UN prohibition regime was established. “We must have enough flexibility to allow us to incorporate those changes into our policies.”

Of course, treaty or no treaty, the Constitution does not grant the federal government any power to either criminalize substances — that is why alcohol prohibition required an amendment — or to force states into submission on the issue. Indeed, America’s Founders, the Constitution, and the U.S. Supreme Court have all made clear that the federal government may not expand its powers beyond those delegated in the Constitution merely by adopting treaties. Washington, D.C., is explicitly prohibited from commandeering state and local governments to enforce its policies. The UN, though, appears ignorant or unconcerned about the constraints on federal power imposed by America’s system of limited constitutional government.