Texas Provides Virginia Lethal Injection Drugs Ahead of Pending Execution

Texas prison officials are helping Virginia prepare to put a man to death for the first time since 2013 by providing a hard-to-come-by lethal injection drug in the midst of a nationwide shortage.

The Virginia Department of Corrections confirms it received doses of the drug pentobarbital from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for use in the scheduled Thursday execution of Alfredo Prieto, who was convicted of three murders and identified as the prime suspect in six others.

The disclosure was revealed in court filings made by an Oklahoma death row inmate, Richard Glossip, who is scheduled to be executed on Wednesday. In court documents, Glossip alleged that Texas was making its own pentobarbital and argued that was at odds with what Oklahoma has said about its inability to obtain the drug. Instead, Oklahoma uses a drug called midazolam, which came under scrutiny following its use in several botched executions. The Supreme Court has since then upheld use of the drug.

Texas officials said the drugs were provided to Virginia as a favor for a 2013 trade when Virginia provided Texas a back-up dose of pentobarbital ahead of an execution there.

The disclosure was revealed in court filings made by an Oklahoma death row inmate, Richard Glossip, who is scheduled to be executed on Wednesday. In court documents, Glossip alleged that Texas was making its own pentobarbital and argued that was at odds with what Oklahoma has said about its inability to obtain the drug. Instead, Oklahoma uses a drug called midazolam, which came under scrutiny following its use in several botched executions. The Supreme Court has since then upheld use of the drug.