FDA Study Finds Little Evidence of Antibiotics in Milk

In an encouraging development for consumers worried about antibiotics in their milk, a new Food and Drug Administration study showed little evidence of drug contamination after surveying almost 2,000 dairy farms.

In response to concerns, the agency in 2012 took samples of raw milk from the farms and tested them for 31 drugs, almost all of them antibiotics. Results released by the agency Thursday show that less than 1 percent of the total samples showed illegal drug residue.

Antibiotics and other drugs can end up in milk when they are used on dairy cows to keep them healthy. Small levels of some drugs are allowed in milk, but residues that go beyond certain thresholds are illegal.

“Overall this is very encouraging and reinforces the idea that the milk supply is safe,” said the FDA’s William Flynn, who led the study. He said the agency will use the findings to try and reduce the drug contamination even more.